Welcome to

Year 6

Year 6 2020 – 2021

Mrs Brimelow

 

Welcome to Year 6

Hi Year 6

Please visit our Year 6 page regularly and click on the tabs above to keep up to date with:

  • important information;
  • news and photographs relating to recent activites,
  • our curriculum map.

13.05.20

Good Afternoon 

I hope you are all still well. 

You may have heard that schools may reopen for pupils in Year 6 in June and some of you may wish to return. I have been in school today and have begun planning how this may work if it goes ahead. Y6 will split in to smaller groups. I have set the desks 2m apart  and there is room for 12 pupils. The other groups will work probably work in the Y5/4 classrooms. Shared resources such as pencil crayons and scissors have been cleaned and shared out so you will have your own set. Any workbooks will stay in your desks. There is so much to think about but we will try our hardest over the next few weeks to make it safe for you to return if you wish to. 

For those who wish to stay at home and continue learning as you have been so far, the Government have made available a series of online lessons which will be updated weekly. Should you wish to view the Government’s resources please search for Oak National Academy.

Lancashire maths team have also put together a daily set of lessons and these can be found by copying the link  

http://www.lancsngfl.ac.uk/curriculum/primarymaths/index.php?category_id=1211

At the top of our class page is a tab for Scince – learning at home and there are some lovely ideas on there. 

It is important to remember that these documents are a guide and that, as students and parents/carers, you should always take into account that distance learning is still a new way of working for us all and that the single most important factor for anyone is that the work is manageable and that you stay home and stay safe. Please ring school if you need any help.

Mrs Brimelow 

Key Learning in Maths

Key learning in Maths

Number – number and place value

  • Count forwards or backwards in steps of integers, decimals, powers of 10

  • Read, write, order and compare numbers up to 10 000 000 and determine the value of each digit

  • Identify the value of each digit to three decimal places

  • Identify, represent and estimate numbers using the number line

  • Order and compare numbers including integers, decimals and negative numbers

  • Find 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and powers of 10 more/less than a given number

  • Round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy

  • Round decimals with three decimal places to the nearest whole number or one or two decimal places

  • Multiply and divide numbers by 10, 100 and 1000 giving answers up to three decimal places

  • Use negative numbers in context, and calculate intervals across zero

  • Describe and extend number sequences including those with multiplication and division steps, inconsistent steps, alternating steps and those where the step size is a decimal


Solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above

Number – fractions, decimals and percentages

  • Compare and order fractions, including fractions > 1 (including on a number line)

  • Use common factors to simplify fractions; use common multiples to express fractions in the same denomination

  • Recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages, including in different contexts

  • Associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents (e.g. 0.375 and  )

  • Add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions

  • Multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form (e.g.  x  =  )

  • Divide proper fractions by whole numbers (e.g.  ÷ 2 =  )

  • Find simple percentages of amounts

  • Solve problems involving fractions

  • Solve problems which require answers to be rounded to specified degrees of accuracy


Solve problems involving the calculation of percentages (e.g. of measures and such as 15% of 260) and the use of percentages for comparison

Ratio and proportion

  • Solve problems involving the relative sizes of two quantities where missing values can be found using integer multiplication/division facts

  • Solve problems involving unequal sharing and grouping using knowledge of fractions and multiples


Solve problems involving similar shapes where the scale factor is known or can be found

Number -addition and subtraction

  • Choose an appropriate strategy to solve a calculation based upon the numbers involved (recall a known fact, calculate mentally, use a jotting, written method)

  • Select a mental strategy appropriate for the numbers in the calculation

  • Recall and use addition and subtraction facts for 1 (with decimals to two decimal places)

  • Perform mental calculations including with mixed operations and large numbers and decimals

  • Add and subtract whole numbers and decimals using formal written methods (columnar addition and subtraction)

  • Use estimation to check answers to calculations and determine, in the context of a problem, an appropriate degree of accuracy

  • Use knowledge of the order of operations to carry out calculations

  • Solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why


Solve problems involving all four operations, including those with missing numbers

Number – multiplication and division

  • Choose an appropriate strategy to solve a calculation based upon the numbers involved (recall a known fact, calculate mentally, use a jotting, written method)

  • Identify common factors, common multiples and prime numbers

  • Use partitioning to double or halve any number

  • Perform mental calculations, including with mixed operations and large numbers

  • Multiply multi-digit numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long multiplication

  • Multiply one-digit numbers with up to two decimal places by whole numbers

  • Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written methods of short or long division, and interpret remainders as whole number remainders, fractions, or by rounding, as appropriate for the context

  • Use written division methods in cases where the answer has up to two decimal places

  • Use estimation and inverse to check answers to calculations and determine, in the context of a problem, an appropriate degree of accuracy

  • Use knowledge of the order of operations to carry out calculations


Solve problems involving all four operations, including those with missing numbers

Geometry – properties of shapes

  • Compare/classify geometric shapes based on the properties and sizes

  • Draw 2-D shapes using given dimensions and angles

  • Illustrate and name parts of circles, including radius, diameter and circumference and know that the diameter is twice the radius

  • Recognise, describe and build simple 3-D shapes, including making nets

  • Recognise angles where they meet at a point, are on a straight line, or are vertically opposite, and find missing angles


Find unknown angles in any triangles, quadrilaterals, regular polygons

Geometry – position and direction

  • Describe positions on the full coordinate grid (all four quadrants)


Draw and translate simple shapes on the coordinate plane, and reflect them in the axes

Statistics

  • Continue to complete and interpret information in a variety of sorting diagrams (including sorting properties of numbers and shapes)

  • < > and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problemsSolve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in all types of graph


Calculate and interpret the mean as an average

Algebra

  • Use simple formulae

  • Generate and describe linear number sequences

  • Express missing number problems algebraically

  • Find pairs of numbers that satisfy an equation with two unknowns


Enumerate possibilities of combinations of two variables

Measurement

  • Use, read and write standard units of length, mass, volume and time using decimal notation to three decimal places

  • Convert between standard units of length, mass, volume and time using decimal notation to three decimal places

  • Convert between miles and kilometres

  • Recognise that shapes with the same areas can have different perimeters and vice versa

  • Calculate the area of parallelograms and triangles

  • Recognise when it is possible to use formulae for area and volume of shapes

  • Calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids using standard units, including cubic centimetres (cm3) and cubic metres (m3), and extending to other units (e.g. mm3 and km3)

  • Calculate differences in temperature, including those that involved a positive and negative temperature


Solve problems involving the calculation and conversion of units of measure, using decimal notation up to three decimal places where appropriate

Key Learning in Writing

Key learning in Writing

Composition

Vocabulary,Grammar and Punctuation

  • Manipulate sentences to create particular effects.

  • Use devices to build cohesion between paragraphs in persuasive, discursive and explanatory texts e.g. on the other hand, the opposing view, similarly, in contrast, although, additionally, another possibility, alternatively, as a consequence.

  • Use devices to build cohesion between paragraphs in narrative e.g. in the meantime, meanwhile, in due course, until then.

  • Identify and use colons to introduce a list.

  • Identify and use semi-colonsto mark the boundary between independent clauses e.g. It is raining; I am fed up.

  • Investigate and collect a range of synonymsand antonyms e.g. mischievous, wicked, evil, impish, spiteful, well-behaved.

  • Explore how hyphens can be used to avoid ambiguity e.g. man eating shark versus man-eating shark.

  • Punctuate bullet pointsconsistently

  • Explore and collect vocabulary typical of formal and informal speech and writing e.g. find out – discover, ask for – request, go in – request.

  • Identify the subject and objectof a sentence.

  • Explore and investigate active ande.g. I broke the window in the greenhouse versus the window in the greenhouse was broken.


Composition

  • Plan their writing by:

  • Identifying audience and purpose.

  • Choose appropriate text-form and type for all writing.

  • Selecting the appropriate language and structures.

  • Drawing on similar writing models, reading and research.

  • Using a range of planning approaches e.g. storyboard, story mountain, discussion group, post-it notes, ICT story planning.

  • Draft and write by:
Selecting appropriate vocabulary and language effects, appropriate to task, audience and purpose, for precision and impact.

  • Introducing and developing characters through blending action, dialogue and description within sentences and paragraphs e.g. Tom stomped into the room, flung down his grubby, school bag and announced, through gritted teeth, “It’s not fair”

  • Using devices to build cohesion.

  • Deviating narrative from linear or chronological sequencee.g. flashbacks, simultaneous actions, time-shifts.

  • Combining text-types to create hybrid texts e.g. persuasive speech.

  • Evaluating, selecting and using a range of organisation and presentational devices for different purposes and audiences.

  • Make conscious choices about techniques to engage the reader including appropriate tone and style e.g. rhetorical questions, direct address to the reader.

  • Use active and passive voice to achieve intended effects e.g. in formal reports, explanations and mystery narrative.

  • Evaluate and edit by:

  • Reflecting upon the effectiveness ofwriting in relation to audience and purpose, suggesting and making changes to enhance effects and clarify meaning.

  • Proofreading for grammatical, spelling and punctuation errors.

  • Evaluate and improve performances of compositions focusing on:

  • Intonation and volume.

  • Gesture and movement.

  • Audience engagement.
  • Finding examples of where authors have broken conventions to achieve specific effects and using similar techniques in own writing – e.g. repeated use of ‘and’ to convey tedium, one word sentence.

  • Make conscious choices about techniques to engage the reader including appropriate tone and style e.g. rhetorical questions, direct address to the reader.
  • Use active and passive voice to achieve intended effects e.g. in formal reports, explanations and mystery narrative.
  • Evaluate and edit by:

  • Reflecting upon the effectiveness of  writing in relation to audience and purpose, suggesting and making changes to enhance effects and clarify meaning.
  • Proofreading for grammatical, spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Evaluate and improve performances of compositions focusing on:

  • Intonation and volume.
  • Gesture and movement.
  • Audience engagement.

Transcription

Spelling

  • Be secure with all spelling rules previously taught.
  • Write increasingly confidently, accurately and fluently, spelling with automaticity.
  • Use a number of different strategies interactively in order to spell correctly.
  • Develop self-checking and proof-checking strategies.

Use independent spelling strategies for spelling unfamiliar words.

Handwriting

  • Write with increasing speed.

Choosing the writing implement that is best suited for a task (e.g. quick notes, letters).

Key Learning in Reading

Key Learning in Reading

Word Reading

 

  • Use knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes to investigate how the meanings of words change e.g. un+happy+ness, dis+repute+able, dis+respect+ful, re+engage+ment.

  • Use suffixes to understand meanings e.g. –cious, -tious, -tial, -cial.

  • Read and understand meaning of words on Y5/6 word list – see bottom.

  • Use etymology to help the pronunciation of new words e.g. chef, chalet, machine, brochure – French in origin.

  • Employ dramatic effect to engage listeners whilst reading aloud.

  • Read extensively for pleasure

  • Evaluate texts quickly in order to determine their usefulness or appeal.

  • Understand underlying themes, causes and consequences within whole texts.

  • Understand the structures writers use to achieve coherence; (headings; links within and between paragraphs; connectives).


Recognise authors’ techniques to influence and manipulate the reader.

Comprehension

Maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding what they read by:

  • Listening to, reading and discussing an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays and non-fiction.

  • Regularly listening to novels read aloud by the teacher from an increasing range of authors, which they may not choose themselves.

  • Recognising themes within and across texts e.g. hope, peace, fortune, survival.

  • Making comparisons within and across texts e.g. similar events in different books, such as being an evacuee in Carrie’s War and Goodnight Mr Tom.

  • Comparing texts written in different periods.

  • Analysing the conventions of different types of writing e.g. use of dialogue to indicate geographical and/or historical settings for a story.

  • Independently read longer texts with sustained stamina and interest.

  • Recommending books to their peers with detailed reasons for their opinions.

  • Expressing preferences about a wider range of books including modern fiction, traditional stories, fiction from our literary heritage and books from other cultures and traditions.

  • Learning a wider range of poems by heart.

  • Preparing poems and playscripts to read aloud and perform using dramatic effects.


Understand what they read by:

  • Using a reading journal to record on-going reflections and responses to personal reading.

  • Exploring texts in groups and deepening comprehension through discussion.

  • Exploring new vocabulary in context.

  • Demonstrating active reading strategies e.g. challenging peers with questions, justifying opinions, responding to different viewpoints within a group.

  • Inferring characters feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, justifying inferences with evidence e.g. Point;Evidence;Explanation.

  • Predicting what might happen from information stated and implied.

  • Re-read and reads ahead to locate clues to support understanding and justifying with evidence from the text.

  • Scanning for key information e.g. looking for descriptive words associated with a setting.

  • Skimming for gist.

  • Using a combination of skimming, scanning and close reading across a text to locate specific detail.

  • Identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning e.g. persuasive leaflet, balanced argument.


 

Discuss / evaluate how authors use language including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader by:

  • Exploring, recognising and using the terms personification, analogy, style and effect.

  • Explaining the effect on the reader of the authors’ choice of language and reasons why the author may have selected these.


 

Distinguish between statements of fact or opinion across a range of texts e.g. first-hand account of an event compared with a reported example such as Samuel Pepys’ diary and a history textbook.

Participate in discussions about books building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously.

Explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where necessary by:

  • Preparing formal presentations individually or in groups.

  • Using notes to support presentation of information.

  • Responding to questions generated by a presentation.

  • Participating in debates on issues related to reading (fiction/non-fiction).


Provide reasoned justifications for their views

Justifying opinions and elaborating by referring to the text e.g. Point;Evidence;Explanation

Year 6 Gallery